An Abandoned Ghost Ship Reappears After A Decade Lost At Sea

Going out to sea can always be an adventure, because anything can mysteriously appear out of the water. This was certainly true for a particular group of fishermen off the coast of East Asia. While sailing the high seas, they were frozen in their tracks after they noticed a dark figure approaching them. As the figure got closer, they knew it was time to investigate. Keep reading to discover what they found, its dark past, and why the authorities needed to get involved.

Something Wicked This Way Comes

fishermen in myanmar paddling in the water
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

A group of fishermen were about to get the experience of a lifetime. On August 30, 2018, they were working in the Yangon Region of the southeastern Asian country of Myanmar, but were quickly disrupted.

There was something they couldn’t quite recognize coming towards them. The shape of the dark figure was something they hadn’t ever seen before and they thought it might be time to contact the local authorities. The fishermen sprung into action to get a better look.

Calling Out For Help

A general view of a Yangon river and city skyline
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The fishermen needed to get as many people as possible involved in order for them to protect themselves and those around them. They called the Coast Guard, Navy, and police and told them what was going on.

It didn’t take long for the officials to arrive on the scene to start the investigation. They figured the figure was something foreign, but weren’t sure how much of a threat it would be to the fishermen and other people by the water.

Things Start Getting Clearer

A man rides in a small boat past a container ship in the Yangon River
Sai Aung Main/Getty Images
Sai Aung Main/Getty Images

When the authorities arrived, they soon realized that the dark figure was some kind of ghost ship. According to Marine Insight, “Ghost ships are those sea going vessels which have been associated with some kind of supernatural activity or unexplained power.”

The authorities had requested that the ship give off a signal that someone was there, but nothing happened. This ghost ship had been abandoned with no apparent sign of passengers or any other forms of life onboard.

The Investigation Continues

top of the ghost ship in the water
Yangon Police/Facebook
Yangon Police/Facebook

The Burmese authorities started to get closer to the ghost ship in order to get more answers as to why it had shown up out of nowhere. They noticed that it hit a sandbar, which left it frozen in the water.

Now, it was time for them to climb aboard to see if there was a chance of life there. Each team looked around, but couldn’t find anyone there. They also noticed that the ship had never made a distress call from crew members looking for help.

A New Clue

sam ratulangi pb 1600 written on the side of the ship
Yangon Police/Facebook
Yangon Police/Facebook

The abandoned ghost ship stayed stuck on the sandbar as the different teams of authorities kept investigating its mysterious appearance. Finally, someone noticed a huge clue written on the side of the ship.

They saw the words “Sam Ratulangi PB 1600” written in large white letters and realized they could use that clue to look up where this ship might have come from. The vessel was starting to decay, so they weren’t quite sure how old it was.

Some Theories Started To Form

A view of sunset in Yangon, Myanmar
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Now, the team of investigators had the name “Sam Ratulangi PB 1600” to help them come up with theories about how the ghost ship made its way to Myanmar. Some of the authorities thought it could have run off course from a storm, while others thought there could be more sinister reasons it was abandoned.

News of the ghost ship spread across the area. Its arrival started to become a bigger issue than expected, so the Myanmar Navy was drafted for more assistance.

The Navy Uncovers More Evidence

boat wreckage from the ghost ship
Yangon Police/Facebook
Yangon Police/Facebook

The Myanmar Navy had arrived on the scene ready to help local authorities with gathering more evidence from the ghost ship. They had more equipment that could give them a better look at what was onboard.

As they were taking inventory, they saw that the ship was covered in a lot of rust and rot. This was one of the reasons why it wasn’t operational anymore, but they believed that wasn’t the reason why the ship was abandoned.

Still Hoping To Find More Clues

The general view of Myanmar Navy warship
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Shwe Paw Mya Tin/NurPhoto via Getty Images

This lengthy investigation didn’t seem to have an end in sight. The authorities were still hoping they would be able to find some more clues as to why the Sam Ratulangi had appeared out of nowhere.

During an interview with The Myanmar Times, a Yangon official named U Ne Win explained the teams’ findings and their desire to carry on with the investigation. “No crew or cargo was found on the ship. It was quite puzzling how such a big ship turned up in our waters,” said Win.

The Ghost Ship’s Dark Past

The abadoned Indonesian ship
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

After multiple teams had searched the ship, they still couldn’t find any clues as to where the crew or other passengers had gone. It was time to do a deep dive into the ship’s origin.

It didn’t take too long for them to discover that this 580-foot container ship was built in 2001 in Indonesia. The Sam Ratulangi made its first voyage that same year by transporting cargo to many different countries across the world.

The Ship’s Journeys Had To End

A locally made Kwong Hua six speed boat sails past a US-made frigate
Sam Yeh/Getty Images
Sam Yeh/Getty Images

At first, this massive ship seemed like it would be capable of making thousands of journeys during its lifetime, but that was about to change. After about eight years, the ship made its last voyage.

Authorities thought it could have been drifting in the ocean for the last nine years, so they looked through the ship’s logs to see the correct documentation. The Burmese authorities discovered that the ship was registered in Indonesia and the last log stated it was docked in Taiwan in 2009.

Lost In Time

The abadoned Indonesian ship
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

Since the ship’s last log was in 2009, that meant there had been nine years of not knowing its whereabouts. Now was the time to figure out where it had been all these years.

It was possible that the ghost ship had been sailing the high seas without any documentation or any passengers onboard, but there seemed like there was more to the story. In order for the authorities to investigate further, they needed to understand the geography of southeast Asia.

Retracing The Ship’s Path

the Bangladesh side of the Naf River
Adib Chowdhury/Getty Images
Adib Chowdhury/Getty Images

Since there wasn’t anyone steering the ship, it would likely have some issues while out on the open ocean. The Burmese coastline is no place for an empty container ship.

Sailing through the Sittaung River with strong currents and shallow water caused it to rot and rust. It’s nearly impossible for a ship that size to make it through unscathed. That 260-mile long river is only meant for small vessels that transport timber.

Looking For The Missing Crew

The abadoned Indonesian ship
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

One of the biggest questions on everyone’s minds was where the crew aboard the Sam Ratulangi had gone. It seemed impossible that a ship this size would be out at sea alone. There didn’t seem to be any answers as to where the people were.

Suddenly, as some of the investigators were looking at the ship, they noticed something that was slightly out of place. Only someone who’s had lots of experience with ships would have noticed this.

There Was A Major Revelation

The abadoned Indonesian ship
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images
Ye Aung Thu/AFP via Getty Images

Out of the corner of one of the authority’s eyes, they noticed two cables at the front of the ship. This led them to do some more investigating.

The Burmese police kept looking through the logs to understand what happened to the ship after its last voyage in Taiwan nine years prior. As they started getting deeper into the investigation, they noticed something else that was odd. It seemed that the Sam Ratulangi wasn’t the only ship that had suddenly washed ashore in Myanmar.

There Was Another Vessel

A tugboat pushes a ship in the ocean
Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

It turns out that the ghost ship wasn’t alone. The two cables that one of the investigators found was actually a huge clue. Those cables were attached to a small tugboat called the Independence.

The Independence had been tugging the Sam Ratulangi after it went missing sometime in 2009, but now it seemed to have disappeared. The Burmese Navy set out to find any remains of the Independence in order to get some more information on the missing crew aboard the ghost ship.

Locating The Independence

workers looking at a docked ship
Basri Marzuki/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Basri Marzuki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Burmese authorities knew to look along the coastline to have a better chance of finding the Independence. It didn’t take too long for them to find it located about 50 miles away from where the Sam Ratulangi washed ashore.

It just so happened that there was a crew of about 13 people onboard, so the authorities were now finally able to get answers to their long-awaited questions. The missing details of the ghost ship were about to be filled in.

More Questions Came Up

ghost ship in the ocean in myanmar
Yangon Police/Facebook
Yangon Police/Facebook

There was no time to waste. The Burmese authorities got straight to the point and questioned the crew aboard the Independence about its history and how it was connected to the ghost ship. There turned out to be a pretty strong connection between the two vessels.

The crew informed the authorities that they were there when the Independence was tugging the Sam Ratulangi. There had been some turbulent weather, which caused them to change their course.

Getting The Story Straight

a container ship is anchored along the Yangon river
Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images
Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images

It was clear that the crew of the Independence had been tugging the Sam Ratulangi before it appeared on the sandbanks in Myanmar. The crew was actually on their way to a factory in Bangladesh to unload and dismantle some cargo.

The crew had to separate from the ship when the weather got bad. The Sam Ratulangi drifted to the Bay of Bengal, which is in between Bangladesh and Myanmar. That still didn’t answer the question of where the crew of the container ship was, though.

Authorities Kept Searching For The Ghost Ship’s Crew

the ghost ship in the ocean in myanmar
Yangon Police/Facebook
Yangon Police/Facebook

There was nothing that was going to stop the Burmese authorities from locating the crew that was supposedly aboard the ghost ship while it was being tugged by the Independence. It was assumed that they had abandoned the ship after the weather got too dangerous.

The longer the investigation went on, the more questions the authorities started to have. While they weren’t getting any further with finding the missing crew, there were some other details they were able to uncover.

Inside The Ghost Ship

inside the ghost ship with rust and old parts
Myanmar Navy/Facebook
Myanmar Navy/Facebook

While investigators found rot and rust on the outside of the ship, the inside was quite different. After having no maintenance whatsoever after being abandoned, the interior seemed to be in great working condition.

This raised a major question for the investigators, which led to them to wonder what the ship was doing with the Independence. Once the Sam Ratulangi arrived in the Bangladesh factory, it was going to be dismantled and demolished. This didn’t make sense because the ship’s insides were working fine.

What’s Wrong With The Ship?

A small commuter boat makes way in front of container ship
Kuni Takahashi/Getty Images
Kuni Takahashi/Getty Images

Container ships are meant to last a long time. The Sam Ratulangi was built in 2001 and was expected to last about 25 to 30 years. There was a plan to dismantle it, but it was only around 17-years-old.

The two cables that were found by the investigators meant that there were multiple attempts made by the Independence to have it towed away. This didn’t make sense to the authorities because of the ship’s good condition and young age.

There Might Have Been Other Motives

a ship yard in bangladesh
Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket via Getty Images
Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket via Getty Images

Taking a ship that’s in good working condition to get demolished seemed counterintuitive to the investigators. Those who were planning to dismantle the vessel were actually going to sell it to a junkyard for spare parts.

This meant that there was a high chance that the crew onboard the Independence might have had some other motives up their sleeves. Certainly, money was playing an important role as to why the Sam Ratulangi was going to be destroyed.

Money Was The Driving Force

people at a ship yard in bangladesh
Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket via Getty Images
Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket via Getty Images

Investigators were finally able to narrow down the reason why the Independence was towing the Sam Ratulangi. The Independence’s crew were looking for some sort of financial reward as they dragged the ship to the factory in Bangladesh.

No one had claimed the ship as their own, so it was a free-for-all. Dismantling a ship is a lengthy process and there aren’t really any regulations on how to safely accomplish it. The factory workers could have been seriously injured trying to take apart a container vessel of that size.

Where Is The Ship Now?

Myanmar navy personnel stand near a ship
Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images
Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images

The Burmese authorities were relieved to finally have some answers regarding the Sam Ratulangi. Luckily, the ship will stay safe in the hands of the Myanmar Navy, but the investigation isn’t close to being over.

Authorities are still looking into the details regarding the ghost ship’s disappearance and what it had been doing for the last decade or so. They’re also trying to get more information about the abandoned crew, missing cargo, and the ship’s history. Perhaps we’ll get the answers someday.

A Crew Vanished Into Thin Air

A Crew Vanished Into Thin Air
Reddit/u/Kilyan265
Reddit/u/Kilyan265

On April 4th, 1943, a B-24D bomber flew to Italy on her first and final mission. On their way back home, the crew reported aircraft damage and a blinding sandstorm. Then, without explanation, they vanished. The plane wouldn’t be found for over 15 years.

The story of the aircraft Lady Be Good has raised eyebrows for over 70 years. One reason is that a plane disappearing for so long is eerie, to say the least. Another reason is that, after people found the plane, they saw no signs of the pilots. You’ll want to know all about this jaw-dropping historical mystery.

How Lady Be Good Entered World War II

How Lady Be Good Entered World War II
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks

In 1943, the Allied forces turned their attention toward Italy. During that year, Italian citizens had rallied against the war and their dictator, Benito Mussolini. The American Army aimed to take advantage of this unrest, and by doing so, gradually regain the rest of Europe.

Before the ground troupes could invade Italy, the Army sent pilots to destroy some of the nation’s strongholds. They gathered several squadrons of pilots for these missions. One of these was the USAAF B-24D Liberator named Lady Be Good.

Her Mission

Her Misson
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks

According to the plan, Lady Be Good would fly out from the United States’ airforce base in Libya. She would soar over the Mediterranean to bomb Naples on April 4th, 1943. Then, Lady Be Good and her crew would return to Libya for their next mission.

Of course, if this mission had played out smoothly, you wouldn’t be reading this article. Lady Be Good departed at the scheduled time and joined the squadron, but her journey would be plagued by bad weather and an inexperienced crew.

The Inexperienced Crew

The Inexperienced Crew
U.S. Air Force photo
U.S. Air Force photo

Lady Be Good received a nine-person crew, the 376th Bomb Group. They included pilots William Hatton and Robert Toner; navigator D.P. Hays; artillery soldiers Guy Shelley, Vernon Moore, and Samuel Adams; radio operator Robert LaMotte; and flight engineer Harold Ripslinger. All of them were new, having just arrived in Libya that March.

Although the nine men were new to the squadron, they weren’t new to flying. They had substantial military training to pull off the feat. But it was the first combat mission for many members, including the head pilot, Lieutenant Hatton.

Falling Behind From The Start

Falling Behind From The Start
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

On March 25th, Lady Be Good had been assigned to the 514th Bomb Squadron. She would fly with 24 other B-24s to bomb Naples’ harbor. The mission was arranged in waves. Twelve planes left first, followed by the additional 13. Lady Be Good was the last plane in the second wave.

At 2:15 p.m., Lady Be Good left her base at Soluch Field. The crew was already behind the rest of the formation, but their luck would only drop when a sandstorm hit the squadron of B-24s.

And A Terrible Start It Was

And A Terrible Start It Was
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks

During the trip, an intense sandstorm obscured everyone’s vision. In the second squadron, nine B-24s decided to return to Soluch. The sand had gotten into their propellers and made the mission dangerous. Because Lady Be Good’s propellers were still going strong, Lieutenant Hatton decided to continue forward.

But their flight was far from easy. Bombarded by harsh winds, Lady Be Good drifted farther away from the rest of the squadron. The crew located Naples through their automatic direction finder. It’s a miracle that they even made it there.

One Of The Few That Continued Flying

One Of The Few That Continued Flying
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks

Lady Be Good reached Naples around 7:50 p.m. However, she was far away from the rest of the squadron, which had already begun the attack. Plus, the visibly didn’t clear over Naples. The crew couldn’t locate their primary or secondary targets.

Meanwhile, the rest of the B-24s didn’t have an easier time. All reported limited visibility. However, the mission went moderately well; two bombers attacked their secondary targets on the return trip, dumping the rest of their explosives in the Mediterranean sea. But Lady Be Good wasn’t one of those planes.

Before They Even Fought, They Turned Back

Before They Even Fought, They Turned Back
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

Although some of the B-24s carried out their mission in Naples, Lady Be Good never did. With their limited vision, the crew decided to return to Soluch. As the rest of the planes ambushed Naples, the crew of Lady Be Good turned around to begin their solitary journey.

Although the lonely flight sounds daunting, the pilots were equipped to handle it. Like other B-24s, they dumped their bombs into the sea to lighten the plane’s weight and reserve fuel. They would fly for five hours with no trouble until the pilot Lieutenant Hatton radioed in.

Calling For Help

Calling For Help
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

At 12:12 a.m., pilot Hatton sent a radio message to the base. “My ADF has malfunctioned,” he sent. “Please give me a QDM.” To translate, Hatton said that the plane’s automatic direction finder had broken. He requested the base’s coordinates to return home.

Soldiers at the Soluch base sent the crew their coordinates. But for an unknown reason, Lt. Hatton never received their response. People have suggested that a German soldier interfered with their radio signal, but this has never been confirmed.

So Close To Home…

So Close To Home...
YouTube/Nassault
YouTube/Nassault

At the base, soldiers heard the distant droning of a B-24. Assuming that it was Lady Be Good, they sent up flares so that the crew could see them. Reportedly, at least one soldier heard an engine sound pass overhead. But Lady Be Good never landed there.

The crew had overshot the base. Because of the cloud coverage, they did not see the flares that the base fired. After passing over Soluch, Lady Be Good and her crew would continue to fly in a random direction for over two hours.

The Crash, And Then…Nothing

crash
Twitter/@WWIIpix
Twitter/@WWIIpix

Soldiers at Soluch never heard from Lady Be Good after that. When the weather cleared, a search rescue team dispatched to find the plane. They found nothing. With no clues or visible traces, the soldiers at Soluch assumed that she had crashed into the Mediterranean Sea.

Lady Be Good wasn’t the only plane to disappear during World War II. However, she was one of the few aircraft to eventually be found. Thirteen years after the end of World War II, Lady Be Good would accidentally be discovered, and this would only heighten the mystery.

An Accidental Discovery

An Accidental Discovery
Twitter/@DeividNagan
Twitter/@DeividNagan

In 1958, oil explorers scavenged the deserts of Libya. The D’Arcy Oil Company–later renamed to British Petroleum–was one of the businesses involved. On November 9th, an oil exploration team flew over the northeastern Kufra Distract.

During their flight, the crew noticed a crashed plane in the desert. They shared their findings with Wheelus Air Base. However, the authorities didn’t react. They had no records of a lost plane and therefore had no reason to pursue a supposed wreck. Still, the oil team marked the plane’s location on their map.

Approaching Lady Be Good

Approaching Lady Be Good
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

Although Lady Be Good had been found, she wouldn’t be investigated until the next year. In that year, two other pilots had spotted the crash–the crew of a Silver City Airways Dakota and another anonymous pilot. When British oil surveyors and geologists spotted Lady Be Good on February 27th, 1959, Wheelus Air Base finally took action.

On March 26th, 1959, a recovery team reached the remains of Lady Be Good. She had landed 440 miles (710 km) southeast of Soluch. No one expected to find what Lady Be Good contained.

Like The Crew Had Suddenly Vanished

Like The Crew Had Suddenly Vanished
Reddit/u/KapitanKurt
Reddit/u/KapitanKurt

Although Lady Be Good had split in two, she was remarkably intact. Despite the crew’s lack of contact during the night they disappeared, the radio still worked. The 50-caliber guns were still functioning and fully loaded. But other details suggested that the crew had vanished into thin air.

To start, no bodies were in the cabin. There was still some food and water that, for some reason, the crew didn’t bring with them. Even a thermos filled with tea was still drinkable. If the soldiers weren’t there, and they hadn’t taken supplies with them, where did they go?

The Mystery Continues

The Mystery Continues
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

The crash site raised more questions than answers. If the crew members weren’t in the Lady Be Good, where could they be? Why didn’t they take any supplies with them? And if the radio was still working, why didn’t they contact the Soluch base?

The search lasted from May to the end of August in 1959. During this time, the American Army conducted both ground and air investigations. They searched for so long that their equipment began to deteriorate from the sand and wind. But beyond locating some boots and parachutes, they found no trace of the Lady Be Good crew.

Launching The Second Search

Launching The Second Search
Twitter/@WWIIpix
Twitter/@WWIIpix

During the initial search, a D’Arcy Oil Company surveyor, Gordon Bowerman, accompanied the rescuers from Wheelus Air Base. After he explored the plane, he sent the details in a letter to Lieutenant Colonel Walter B. Kolbus. Neither man had an answer for what had occurred.

With Kolbus’s help, Wheelus Air Force Base launched another investigation with the Army Quartermaster Mortuary from Frankfurt, Germany. But by the beginning of 1960, the Quartermaster Mortuary crew left the search. The remaining search party stayed behind, hunting for answers.

Finding Five Of The Crew Members

five
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

In February 1960–two years after Lady Be Good was found–rescuers uncovered the crew. The five men were found on February 11th, buried beneath Saharan dunes. They were identified as Lt. Hatton, Lt. Hays, Lt. Toner, Sgt. La Motte, and Sgt. Adams. After this discovery, the Army Quartermaster Mortuary returned to aid the workers.

Several items accompanied the men. These included flashlights, pieces of parachutes, flight jackets, and one canteen. But the most noteworthy was a diary kept by Lieutenant Robert Toner, Lady Be Good‘s co-pilot.

Operation Climax

operation
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

With the first five men discovered, the U.S. Army joined the investigation. They named the final stretch “Operation Climax” and set out to uncover the other four crew members. The mission stretched from February through May.

Soon, they located Sgt. Shelley, 21 miles northeast of the other five men. Sgt. Ripslinger was found 26 miles north of Sgt. Shelley. How did they end up so far apart from each other? And why were two men separated from the rest? With fewer answers than before, Operation Climax ended.

The Final Find, And Connecting The Pieces

The Final Find, And Connecting The Pieces
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

Although the American Army left after Operation Climax, the D’Arcy Oil Company continued the search. In August, they finally discovered Lt. Woravka, the crew’s Bombardier. To this day, though, there is one man still missing. That is Starr Sergeant Moore, one of Lady Be Good‘s gunners and radio operators.

With most of the crew found, rescuers began collecting the data. They examined the information from Lt. Toner’s diary. From there, they came up with a theory for what happened to the Lady Be Good crew.

What Likely Happened

What Likely Happened
YouTube/Oshkosh Media
YouTube/Oshkosh Media

Although we can never know for sure what happened to Lady Be Good‘s crew, experts have pieced together an answer from the remains. A notepad from bombardier Woravka indicated some of the crew’s conversation: “What’s going to happen? Are we going home?”

As Lady Be Good ran out of fuel, the crew had no choice but to abandon the plane. They had likely expected to parachute into the Mediterranean Sea. Instead, they landed in the Calanshino Sand Sea, an area of endless sand dunes in the middle of the Sahara desert.

Why They Abandoned All Their Supplies

Why They Abandoned All Their Supplies
Flickr/@Insomnia Cured Here
Flickr/@Insomnia Cured Here

Meanwhile, Lady Be Good flew an extra 16 miles (26 km) south before it crashed. That explains how the crew left their supplies in the aircraft. Believing that they were close to civilization, they likely planned to find help instead of sticking with the plane.

The crew had no idea that they were within walking distance of their plane, which contained all of their water, rations, shade, and a working radio. Had they run into Lady Be Good, they might have survived and been rescued. Unfortunately, they traveled in the opposite direction.

Regrouping With One Less Person

Regrouping With One Less Person
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

After the crew parachuted to safety, they located each other by firing flares and revolvers. Eight of the nine crew members reunited this way. The final member, Lt. Woravka, struggled with his parachute and died in the fall. But his fellow soldiers didn’t know that.

The rest of the story was pieced together through Toner’s diary. According to him, the crew assumed that they were close to the Mediterranean coast, but they were actually 400 miles (640 km) inland. Experts suggest that, from the plane, the desert floor looked like the sea at night.

In The Desert With One Canteen Of Water

desert
Twitter/@MokraniHasna
Twitter/@MokraniHasna

According to Toner’s diary, the remaining crew chose to head northwest. They set out through the Sahara Desert with a few rations and only one canteen of water to share. They each drank one capful per day.

As the group walked, they left behind some items such as flight vests, pieces of parachutes, and shoes. Experts believe that they left those as markers so they could return to their crash site. Toner wrote that they walked at night and rested during the day.

Their Miserable Journey

Their Miserable Journey
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

By Wednesday, April 7th, Toner wrote that his crew was having a hard time. “Can’t sleep,” he jotted in his brief entries. “Everyone sore from ground.” Three days of little water and food were beginning to weigh on the crew, but it was about to get worse.

The next day, sandstorms hindered their eyesight. “La Motte eyes are gone,” Toner wrote, likely indicating that he had gone blind from the sand. “Everyone else’s eyes are bad.” Despite the storms, they continued to travel northwest.

The Group Separates

The Group Separates
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

After four days, the crew had walked 81 miles (130 km) from their original crash site. Five men felt too exhausted to continue. Against all odds, three of the crew–Shelly, Ripslinger, and Moore–moved forward to find help.

Toner stayed behind, and he recorded their final days in his diary. For four nights, he wrote that all men were praying for help. “Nites very cold,” he recorded. “No sleep.” We have no lasting accounts of what happened to the three to continued to search for someone–anyone–to help them.

Their Final Days

Their Final Days
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

Toner’s final entry on Monday, April 12th, read in thick pencil lines: “No help yet, very cold nite.” That was the last account of the group before all five perished in the desert. Sadly, they had no idea that they had walked the opposite direction from Lady Be Good.

Shelley was found 20 miles (32 km) away from the rest, while Ripslinger managed to walk 27 miles (43) farther. Moore has never been found. In total, they survived eight days in the Saharan desert.

Honoring The Fallen Soldiers

Honoring The Fallen Soldiers
YouTube/Randy Skinner
YouTube/Randy Skinner

When the remains of the eight men were found, soldiers covered them in American flags. The search team gave them a proper military sendoff in the middle of the Saharan desert. Then, they sent the crew’s bodies to their families in the United States and buried.

Today, the Wheelus Airbase displays a memorial to the crew of Lady Be Good. The stained-glass memorial stands in the base’s chapel. Lady Be Good’s propeller also stands as a memorial in Lake Linden, Michigan.

But What Happened To The Plane?

But What Happened To The Plane
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks
YouTube/Wartime Wrecks

During its 17 years in the desert, Lady Be Good fell victim to souvenir scavengers. As a result, pieces of the B-24D have popped up in several locations. Other parts are held by the March Field Air Museum in California.

But the bulk of the plane is stored at Jamal Abdelnasser Air Force Base in Libya. Some of the parts were sent to the United States Army after Lady Be Good was identified. After they were evaluated, the parts were reused for future aircraft.

A Seventeen-Year-Old Mystery, Finally Solved

A Seventeen-Year-Old Mystery, Finally Solved
YouTube/Nassault
YouTube/Nassault

The discovery of the soldiers became a media sensation. In particular, the release of Toner’s diary disturbed, saddened, and captivated people at the same time. The entire nation mourned for both the fallen soldiers and their families.

Despite the evidence, there were always skeptics who didn’t buy the story. They argued that the crew had actually been sold as Bedouin slaves. Since they never presented evidence for this theory, these skeptics remained few and far in between. Most people acknowledge the story of Lady Be Good through the photo evidence and Toner’s diary.

How Their Story Influenced The World

How Their Story Influenced The World
Flickr/@readthebook2
Flickr/@readthebook2

Over the years, the sudden disappearance of Lady Be Good and the heart-wrenching struggle of the passengers has piqued peoples’ imaginations. The crew’s story inspired many fictional stories.

In 1964, Elleston Trevor wrote The Flight of the Phoenix which displays many similarities to Lady Be Good. The novel was turned into a 1965 film and a 2004 film. During the episode of The Twilight Zone called “King Nine Will Not Return,” a grave marker in the desert says “5 April 1943.” This is the date when Lady Be Good was lost.