Finish Him! Things You May Not Know About The Karate Kid

Released in 1984, The Karate Kid is a martial arts drama film starring Ralph Macchio, Pat Morita, and Elisabeth Shue. The movie follows the story of Daniel LaRusso, a new kid in the Los Angeles area who learns karate from Mr. Miyagi, his apartment complex’s handyman and karate master. Upon its release, the film was acclaimed by critics and audiences, launching Macchio’s career, revitalizing Morita’s and popularizing karate in the United States. Now, step into the dojo and check out these lesser-known facts about The Karate Kid.

“You’re The Best” Was Written For A Different Film

Karate tournament
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

One of the most iconic montage scenes of the 1980s is when Daniel LaRusso works his way through the climactic karate tournament with Joe Esposito’s “You’re The Best” blasting in the background.

Unknown to most, was that the song was initially written by Bill Conti and Allee Willis to be featured in Rocky III, but was replaced by “Eye of the Tiger.” It was later revealed that the song was also planned to be used in the movie Flashdance as well, but was beat out by “Maniac.”

The Location Of Mr. Miyagi’s House Remained A Mystery For Some Time

Exterior of the house
Columbia Studios
Columbia Studios

Many of the filming locations for the Karate Kid are easy enough to find in the Los Angeles area, with many of them looking the same today. However, one location that even Karate Kid superfans had a hard time finding was Mr. Miyagi’s house.

Then, in 2014, one fan went above and beyond to find the location and succeeded. They found the land that Mr. Miyagi’s house once stood on although it was unfortunately demolished in the late 1980s.

There Were Supposed To Be More Confrontations Between Johnny And Daniel

Johnny and Daniel in the cafeteria
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the original script, two other confrontations between Johnny and Daniel existed but were cut from the film. The first takes place in the cafeteria after Johnny buys Ali lunch. Before Daniel sits down, Johnny places a muffin on his chair, which Daniel proceeds to sit on.

Daniel then smears the blueberries on Johnny’s shirt, and chaos ensues. The other scene is when Daniel lifts his head from the drinking fountain to find himself face-to-face with Johnny. He then stands up for himself and questions the values of the Cobra Kai.

One Of The World’s Most Respected Karate Teaches In The World Was In The Film

Mr. Miyagi crane kick
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the semi-finals of the tournament, those still competing include Daniel, Johnny, Bobby, and a character credited as “Karate Semi-Finalist,” who is played by the real-life black belt Darryl Vidal. Today, Vidal is a 10th-degree black belt and is considered one of the greatest in the sport.

However, he did more than just act in the tournament. In one of the more memorable scenes in the film, Mr. Miyagi can be seen doing a crane kick from a distance on a wooden post. Unsurprisingly, this was not Pat Morita, but Vidal, who wore a bodysuit and a bald cap for the scene.

The Tournament Wasn’t Supposed To Be The End Of The Film

Mr. Miyagi vs. Kreese
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Although Daniel being victorious over Johnny at the karate tournament seems to be a very fitting ending, that’s not what it was in the script. The film was supposed to conclude in a confrontation between Kreese and Miyagi in the parking lot, which turned out to be the opening scene in the sequel.

Furthermore, the novelization of the film by B.B. Hiller and copies of the early script had Miyagi twisting Kreese’s nose and the Cobra Kai dropping their belts around their defeated teacher.

Happy Gilmore’s Mom Makes An Appearance

Danny and older woman
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

When Daniel and his mom are entering their new apartment complex for the first time, Daniel stops to speak with an elderly woman who says that she’s from Parsippany, New Zealand, also giving him unclear directions to Mr. Miayagi’s workshop.

If she looks familiar, that’s because she’s the character that plays Happy’s grandmother in Adam Sandler’s Happy Gilmore. She has also made appearances in Twin Peaks and also the woman that Jerry steals a loaf of bread in Seinfeld.

Screenwriter Dennis Palumbo Had A Different Vision For The Film

Cobra Kai dojo
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

When former screenwriter Dennis Palumbo was offered the screenwriting job for the film, he responded by saying he would take the job as long as Daniel lost the fight in the end.

He explained that “You can’t have Mr. Miyagai tell him, ‘It doesn’t matter if you win or lose’ for 90 minutes and then have him win.” However, he later admitted that he was wrong, stating, “But that’s because I was being a moron…Now, they made four sequels to that movie, so I was obviously wrong.”

Mr. Miyagi’s Military Experience Was Based In Reality

Danny and Mr. Miyagi
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

During the scene when Mr. Miyagi is intoxicated and celebrating his “anniversary,” he reveals to Daniel that he served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team of the United States Army.

As it turns out, the 442nd Regiment really did exist and was made up of mostly Japanese Americans, many of whom had been in internment camps in the United States. The regiment fought overseas in Europe during World War II and became the most highly-decorated unit in the history of the American military.

Rumors About Chuck Norris

Kove as Kreese
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Rumors have been circulating for years that Martin Kove, who played John Kreese, the sensei of the Kobra Kai, replaced Chuck Norris for the role. Some have said that Norris turned down the role because Kreese’s portrayal of martial arts was too aggressive and violent.

However, it was later revealed that Norris was never even offered the role. Nevertheless, when clearing the air, he noted that he would have turned it down anyway for the same reasons the rumors say.

Elisabeth Shue Then

elisabeth-shue-then
MovieStillsDB
MovieStillsDB

Actress Elisabeth Shue had some major roles in the 80s, including The Karate Kid and Back to the Future. Also a graduate of Harvard, Shue’s acting ability was recognized with several award nominations, including an Academy Award, Golden Globe, and a BAFTA.

The Karate Kid was her film debut in 1983, co-staring opposite of Ralph Macchio as his love interest, Ali Mills. The role launched her career and she later became the love interest of Tom Cruise’s lead characters in Cocktail.

Elisabeth Shue Now

GettyImages-1163099492
Leon Bennett/Getty Images
Leon Bennett/Getty Images

Elisabeth Shue is still acting today, taking a lead role in the superhero drama television series The Boys in 2019 and starring opposite Tom Hanks in the film Greyhound, set to release in 2020.

Throughout the 90s and 00s Shue was considered for several film roles that she either didn’t land or turned down. Still, she’s had a successful career. Shue married director Davis Guggenheim in 1994 and together they have three children.

Kove’s Anger With The Casting Director Helped Him Get The Part

Kove as Kreese
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the DVD documentary about the making of the film, Martin Kove states that he had received a call from John G. Avildsen saying that they wanted him to audition for the role of Kreese, but that he had to wait. Kove wanted the role so badly that he even started turning down other offers.

Unfortunately, the waiting period was weeks, and Kove was getting tired of turning down parts. So, when he was finally called in for the audition, Kove was so angry, that he channeled his emotions into the audition and got the part.

Actor William Zabka Came Up With His Own Backstory For Johnny

Zabka as Johnny
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

According to the commentary in the VHS release of the film, actor William Zabka, who plays Johnny Lawrence, came up with his own backstory for his character.

He did this in order to get “a better feel for his character,” so it felt like Johnny had a reason to be the bully that he was. Zabka envisioned Johnny as a young man with no father, and the closest thing to a father figure that he has is the ruthless Kreese.

An Interesting Fan Theory

Johnny on a motorcycle
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the iconic comedy series How I Met Your Mother, Barney is insistent that Johnny is the real “Karate Kid,” and is one of his personal heroes. This relates to a fan theory that Daniel is actually the real bully and Johnny is the “Karate Kid.”

The theory continues that Johnny only uses his skills for defense like Mr. Miyagi teaches and that Daniel is the instigator. Furthermore, it also suggests that Daniel didn’t want to learn karate to compete with Johnny but as an act of revenge.

The Hidden Name Of The High School

Inside the locker
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Since none of the characters in the movie mention the high school they attend, and there are never any signs or banners shown, it’s assumed that the school went on as nameless. However, there is a small clue that only people really paying attention might be able to catch.

In the scene right before Daniel tells Ali about his “agreement” with Cobra Kai, you can see a sticker inside of his locker, which says “West Valley High School.”

The Word “Bully” Is Never Used

Daniel and Ali talking
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Even though bullying is one of the core themes of The Karate Kid, incredibly, the word “bully,” “bullies,” or any other version of the word is ever used or mentioned throughout the whole film.

Even after the scene when Johnny gets jumped by the Cobra Kais on Halloween when Mr. Miyagi and Daniel are talking, Mr. Miyagi refers to Daniel’s attackers as his “friends.” This must have been intentional and most likely hard to pull off writing-wise.

The Opening Scene Had Historical Significance

Driving in the desert
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

The background shown in the opening credits of the film was shot in Sedona, Arizona. This is the location that many Westerns from the 1940s and 1950s, such as Last Wagon, Leave Her to Heaven, and The Rounders were filmed.

The scene was shot facing north from The Village of Oak Creek to Bell Rock formation that can be seen in the distance. Furthermore, the motel that Danny and his mother stay in is at the center of a major intersection known as the “Y.”

Pat Morita Was Almost Declined The Role Of Mr. Miyagi

Pat as Miyagi
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the early 1980s, Pat Morita was mostly known for his comedic roles in several hit television shows. According to the 2013 book The Films of John G. Avildsen, Morita was Alvidsen’s first choice for the role of Mr. Miyagi.

Yet, producer Jerry Weintraub didn’t think that audiences would be able to see Morita in a serious role considering his career in comedy. After Morita grew a beard and laid on a Japanese accent during his screen test, Weintraub was impressed and changed his mind.

Daniel Should Have Been Disqualified From The Tournament

Final fight scene
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

In the climactic showdown of the film, when Johnny and Daniel face off in the competition, it’s possible that Daniel should have been disqualified for his crane kick. Not only is it against the rules to hit opponents in the face, but it’s also illegal to use “full power,” which Daniel seemingly did.

Although it made for great storytelling, those who are nitpickers about plot holes such as these might not be happy that Daniel received no punishment simply because he’s the hero of the story.

Pat Morita’s Given Name Is Featured In The Credits

Morita as Mr. Miyagi
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Pat Morita plays Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid but is also known for his work on numerous comedy television series, especially his recurring role as Ah Chew on Sanford and Sons.

When making the credits for the end of the film, producer Jerry Weintraub suggested that Morita’s credit in the film should be under his given name, which is Noriyuki, to make it sound more authentic. So, his role is credited as Noriyuki “Pat” Morita.

The Movie Hit The Jackpot At The Box Office

Daniel injured
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Although most people today have at least heard of The Karate Kid even if they haven’t seen it, amazingly, the film was made for a mere $9 million. Yet, upon its release, it earned a whopping $90 million, making it the fifth-biggest movie of 1984.

The only films that surpassed it in terms of earnings included Ghostbusters, Beverly Hills Cop, and Gremlins. However, in terms of box office receipts, it beat out Police Academy, Footloose, Splash, and Revenge of the Nerds.

People Actually Threatened William Zabka After Playing Johnny

Zabka as Johnny
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

According to William Zabka, his character of Johnny still annoys people today and has even branded him as a real-life bully, regardless that he’s far from one. After portraying the leader of the Cobra Kai karate group, he was actually threatened by a real-life karate gang.

He once noted that “There was a guy…in the Valley and he was a friend of mine and came up after the movie and said…there was a real karate gang that was wanting to beat me up, truly, in the Valley.”

The Main Character Was Almost Daniel Webber

Pat Morita And Ralph Macchio In 'The Karate Kid'
Columbia Pictures/Getty Images
Columbia Pictures/Getty Images

Fans of the film would most likely call Daniel LaRusso their favorite character. After all, he was the main character of the movie, aka, “the karate kid.” They also would probably be shocked to hear that the name originally appeared in the script as Daniel Webber.

There’s something disturbingly generic about the name, which makes us glad that they changed it to LaRusso, something that rolls off the tongue. Though it wouldn’t have made a major difference to the film, it clearly was important enough to call for a change.

Johnny’s Character Was Almost Donald Rice

the-karate-kid_zFmBwQ
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures

If you thought that Daniel’s original last name was ill-fitting, you really won’t believe what the screenwriter almost named the antagonist of the movie. Bad boy Johnny Lawrence was named Donald Rice in the initial script!

We can’t imagine being threatened by someone who shares a first name with Donald Duck and whose last name is a grain. Talk about generic! Johnny is a much edgier name, and Lawrence is strong enough to mimic the character’s pride.

The Soccerball To The Face Was Real

the-karate-kid_01f4b7
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures

At one point in the movie, Daniel shows off his soccer skills to his love interest Ali. The character Freddy ends up getting the ball away from Daniel, only to end up with a soccer ball to his face.

In movies, it’s easy to assume that everything is fake and planned out. In this case, the soccer ball really did get Freddy square in the face. As they say, acting isn’t as easy as it seems!

Daniel’s Shower Costume Was From Mr. Miyagi’s Workshop

karate-kid
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Remember that hilarious shower costume that Daniel says his “friend” made him? It turns out the mysterious costume-maker was none other than Mr. Miyagi! You may have had a hunch that this was the case, but there’s a clue in the movie.

Before Daniel shows up dressed as a shower, you can briefly see the costume hanging in the background in a previous scene. It’s dangling from the wall behind Mr. Miyagi in his workshop!

Many Of The Filming Locations Look The Same Today

Apartment 1
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Even though it’s been several decades since The Karate Kid was filmed, many of the locations look the same. One example is this apartment complex located in the LA neighborhood of Reseda.

Other places you can visit to see the film locations include the Canyon Portal Motel, the Leo Carrillo Beach, Charles Evans Junior High, The Orient Express Restaurant, The Dojo, and Ali’s family house in Encino. There’s also Golf ‘N Stuff and countless streets in LA you may recognize from the movie.

Mr. Miyagi’s Home Was Demolished Later That Decade

miyagi-home
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

If you do go on a journey to find all of The Karate Kid filming locations, one spot you won’t be able to view is Mr. Miyagi’s home. That’s because the building was demolished at the end of the ’80s.

The abrupt change may be the reason that fans couldn’t peg the address for decades. It wasn’t until 2014 that a diehard fan was able to confirm the address where Mr. Miyagi’s home used to exist. That’s some determination right there.

Mr. Miyagi’s Worshop Was Really Any Open Parking Structure

miyagi-workshop
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Though the movie would have you believe that Mr. Miyagi’s workshop was an enclosed space, a trip to the actual location will debunk this idea. In actuality, the wall you see pictured here doesn’t exist as part of the apartment complex.

The movie crew fashioned the wall for filming purposes. The real building has an open parking structure where Mr. Miyagi’s workshop was located. They transformed the parking spots into a room and then returned it to its original condition after filming was done.

The Legendary Car Gift

the-karate-kid_8kOrxa
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

One of the things that give The Karate Kid such a happy ending is that classic yellow car that Mr. Miyagi gifts to his faithful student. Though it’s clear that the car is a beauty, you may wonder about the make and model.

Car collectors can tell you that this is a 1948 Ford Super DeLuxe Club convertible. According to classiccars.com, the vehicle is worth about $34,000 today. We’re willing to bet that the one from the actual movie is worth much more, though.

Sensei Kreese And His Successor Were In The Military

the-karate-kid_0XE0Zz
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures
MovieStillsDB/Columbia Pictures

As far as The Karate Kid is concerned, being in the military and practicing karate go together like peanut butter and jelly. Not only does Mr. Miyagi have military experience, but so does his movie rival, Sensei Kreese.

If you followed the Cobra Kai reward wall with a close eye, you might have spotted Kreese wearing military fatigues. Another film that is part of The Karate Kid trilogy introduces Kreese’s successor, Terry Silver, as a Vietnam veteran.

Daniel’s School

karate-kid-locker
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Though it isn’t explicitly stated, fans who closely watched The Karate Kid know that Daniel attends West Valley High School. The most blatant way that the director makes this known is through a brief shot of the inside of Daniel’s locker.

It’s there that we see a West Valley High School sticker. In actuality, the film was shot at a middle school called Charles Evan Junior High. The school has since been repurposed as an adult education center.

The Original Script Tells What Happened To Rocket Computers

karate-kid-orient-express
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Have you ever wondered why Daniel and his mom move to LA for her computer job, and yet she seems to be working at a restaurant later on in the film? The original script had a few lines that clarify what Mrs. LaRusso’s job situation was.

In a conversation that was later cut out, Mrs. LaRusso explains to her son that Rocket Computers went bankrupt! She says as she was leaving, she saw a hostess quit The Orient Express, so she immediately walked in and got the job.

A Vintage Magazine Appears In The Film

karate-kid-magazine
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Those who have really gone through the film with a fine-toothed comb may have noticed that below Daniel’s karate book is a magazine from 1969! At the time, that way only 15 years prior, but it’s still unusual that Mrs. LaRusso would be reading such an old edition.

Even stranger is that their fridge sports a clipping about making a bunny cake. While it makes sense that the clipping would come from an April issue of Family Circle, what doesn’t make sense is why she was reading this at the beginning of Daniel’s school year in September.

One Of The Semi-Finalists Acted As Mr. Miyagi’s Stunt Double

the-karate-kid_W6LtMD
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Remember the semi-finalist who Johnny beat so that he could compete against Daniel in the finals? The person who played that contestant was black belt Darryl Vidal, a teacher who is highly regarded in the karate world.

Darryl is so talented that he was the one who performed the crane kick atop a wooden post. The expert wore a bodysuit and a bald-head wig to look like Mr. Miyagi from afar, acting as Pat Morita’s body-double in that scene.

The Halloween Dance Band Appears On The Soundtrack

karate-kid-band
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

You may have thought that the musicians on stage during the Halloween dance were actors, but they’re actually a real band! Their name is Broken Edge and they’re so talented that they even appear on the soundtrack!

On the album, the song “No Shelter” is by Broken Edge, so it makes sense that the producers reached out to see if they would perform in the actual film. As they say, it’s all about who you know in Hollywood!

The Fight Referee Was Also The Choreographer

the-karate-kid_5GA5je
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Pat Johnson was the actor who played the referee in the heart-pounding semi-finalist and finalist matches. The reason he was so compelling may have something to do with the fact he was also the one who choreographed the fights!

The actors must have felt genuine pressure as all of their moves were closely inspected by the man who choreographed them! It’s no wonder that they made action-figures out of the legendary referee when the movie became a hit.

Elisabeth Shue’s Brother Appears In The Movie

Karate-Kid-Cobra-Kai-tournament-1
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

Do you see that Cobra Kai member hunching down to the far right? That’s none other than Andrew Shue! He’s the brother of Elisabeth Shue, the actress who plays female lead Ali.

The brief role wasn’t prominent enough to earn Andrew any acting credits, but it did at least get his face on camera. Less than a decade later, Andrew would emerge as heartthrob Billy Campbell on the famous soap opera Melrose Place.

Daniel’s Bruised Chin May Have Been Real

karate-kid-chin
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

After boys dressed as skeletons attack Daniel at the Halloween dance, he comes to school with bruises and a scratched face. Though a makeup artist manufactured many of these marks, the bruise on his chin may be real.

In the DVD commentary, actor Ralph Macchio suggests that a roundhouse kick during the fake fight resulted in an actual bruise to his chin. Though the extent of the damage isn’t clear, it’s wild to know that the impact wasn’t all smoke and mirrors.

The Credits State Pat’s Given Name

the-karate-kid_f3a9821a
Columbia Pictures
Columbia Pictures

If you stuck around long enough to watch the credits at the end, you would have noticed something about the name of the man who portrayed Mr. Miyagi. Though the actor goes by Pat Morita, his name is listed as Noriyuki “Pat” Morita.

Noriyuki is Pat’s given name, and producer Jerry Weintraub thought that it would be more “ethnic” to include this name in the credits. We’re fairly sure the name wouldn’t have made any difference, but that’s Hollywood for you!

Joe Pesci Based “Vinny” On Real People He Grew Up With

Pesci Based Vinny On Real People He Grew Up With
20th Century-Fox/Getty Images
20th Century-Fox/Getty Images

In a 1992 interview, Joe Pesci explained that there were a lot of people similar to the character he played in the film. Pesci grew up in Belleville, New Jersey, a city with an intensely diverse population. Many of his inspirations lived close to him throughout his childhood or were from the surrounding smaller neighborhoods.

When preparing for the role, he took a bunch of the people he’d met and put them together to create the “Vinny” we see on-screen.

The Movie Was Inspired By An Interaction Dale Launer Had In The 70s

joe-pesci-82764
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Screenwriter Dale Launer told the American Bar Association that the idea for My Cousin Vinny came to him in the early ’70s when he ran into a guy who was waiting for his bar exam results.

During the conversation, Launer asked the aspiring lawyer what he would do if he failed. The young man responded that he would simply re-write until he passed and explained the most times someone had failed was 13 before passing. Hooked on the idea of what the lawyer who had failed the bar exam 13 times would be like, Launer created Vinny.

The “Yutes” Scene Was Inspired By The Director’s Inability To Understand Pesci

Yutes
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

The conversation between Vinny and Judge Chamberlain Haller about “two yutes” is one of the “most quoted pieces of dialogue from the film” according to director Jonathan Lynn. It was inspired by a conversation between Lynn and Pesci while they were preparing for filming.

Lynn recalled that Pesci said “something about ‘these two yutes’ who were on trial” and Lynn was taken aback. Immediately following their exchange, Lynn decided that Vinny had to have the same interaction with the judge on screen.

Vinny Was Supposed To Be Dyslexic

Vinny Was Supposed To Be Dyslexic
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

After the film was released, Launer let interviewers in on a little writing secret after the film was made: Vinny was supposed to be dyslexic. Launer said he didn’t want to suggest that Vinny was a dopey or slow character so he added in a line that Vinny was dyslexic to explain why it took Vinny five times to pass the bar exam.

The only problem was that Lynn wasn’t sure how to portray a dyslexic character, so he cut the detail out from the movie.

The Movie Was A Very Realistic Representation Of The Legal System

The Movie Was A Very Realistic Representation Of The Legal System
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Since Lynn has a law degree from Cambridge University, the director felt it was his duty to accurately portray the legal system because he knows so much about it.

Even though the movie is a comedy, Lynn made sure to use his law knowledge so that everything you see onscreen in the court scenes could very well take place in real life. His attention to detail paid off and the American Bar Association ranked the comedy No. 3 on its list of the 25 Greatest Legal Movies.

Sac-O-Suds Is A Real Convenience Store You Can Visit In Georgia

Sac-O-Suds Is A Real Convenience Store You Can Visit In Georgia
Instagram / @dillonshand
Instagram / @dillonshand

Even though the film is set in Alabama, much of the production and shooting went on in Georgia and many of the landmarks featured in the film are still standing today. That includes the little hole-in-the-wall convenience store Sac-O-Suds.

The store sells more than cans of tuna. After being renovated and reopened, the store now sells memorabilia from the movie, convenience and hunting gear, and even has a restaurant inside.

The Studio Initially Wanted To Cut Tomei’s Character

The Studio Initially Wanted To Cut Tomei's Character
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

In 2007, Launer revealed that the studio had wanted to get rid of Marisa Tomei’s character, Mona Lisa Vito. In order to keep her in the script, Launer added a scene—at the studio president’s request—which shows her complaining about Vinny not giving her enough attention.

Unwilling to compromise her character, Launer ensured that, despite her complaining, Tomei’s character would be apologetic and remain humorous throughout her disputes with Vinny. Thank goodness they kept her character in because Mona Lisa Vito’s “biological clock” rant is known as one of the best scenes of the film.

There Were Rumors That Marisa Tomei Didn’t Actually Win Her Oscar

There Were Rumors That Marisa Tomei Didn't Actually Win Her Oscar
Steve Starr/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images
Steve Starr/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Long before the Moonlight vs. La La Land blunder at the 2017 Oscars, Marisa Tomei was subjected to her own share of Academy Award controversy. There are some people who still believe rumors that she didn’t actually win. They believe that Jack Palance, the announcer for the award, wasn’t 100% there mentally with he read out Tomei as the winner for Best Supporting Actress.

The rumor has since been debunked, and Tomei even made a joke about it when she hosted Saturday Night Live.

There’s A Plot Hole In Mona Lisa’s Final Speech Which Still Bother’s Launer To This Day

There's A Plot Hole In Mona Lisa's Final Speech Which Still Bother's Launer To This Day
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Vinny’s case is won by Mona Lisa’s pivotal declaration that there were only two cars in the 1960s made with independent rear suspension. Launer later admits this isn’t true, and that the small plothole bothered him for 25 years. There were actually three cars made like that: the Corvette, the Pontiac Tempest, and finally, the Chevy Corvair.

People often say “you’re always your own worst critic,” and that couldn’t be truer for screenwriter Dale Launer.

Will Smith Was Considered For The Role Of Stan Rothenstein

Will Smith Was Considered For The Role Of Stan Rothenstein
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Mitchell Whitfield would go on to play the iconic Stan Rothenstein, but the actor wasn’t the only choice for the role. When he heard that My Cousin Vinny screen tests were being held in New York City, Whitfield flew back to audition and found out that Will Smith had also thrown his hat in and was being considered for the role.

Whitfield’s audition clearly blew the directors away and landed him the part that made his name in Hollywood.

Launer Based Mona Lisa Vito On Jersey Girls He Met While Travelling Abroad

Launer Based Mona Lisa Vito On Jersey Girls He Met While Travelling Abroad
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Jersey stereotypes, widely popularized in television shows like Jersey Shore, are pretty common now, but that wasn’t always the case. Screenwriter Dale Launer was raised in Los Angeles, but he never met a Jersey girl until he came across a group of them while traveling abroad in France.

He had been backpacking through Europe when he met some travelers from Jersey, and was shocked to find they swam with jewelry, makeup, and well-done hair. He was especially shocked by how differently they spoke to him. They must’ve made quite an impression considering they helped inspire Mona Lisa Vito.

Tomei’s Iconic Biological Clock Jumpsuit Didn’t Come From The Costume Department

Tomei’s iconic Biological Clock Jumpsuit Didn't Come From The Costume Department
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Even though Mona Lisa Vito is known for her big hair and her Jersey flair, there is one thing that pops into everyone’s mind when they recall the character—that floral jumpsuit.

The one-piece, skin-tight, open-backed, straight from that old couch in your living room jumpsuit surprisingly didn’t come from the costume department, but from the closet of director Jonathon Lynn’s assistant. She probably wore it just to run errands on the weekend and then it ended up in a blockbuster.

Everything Outside The Courtroom Was Filmed On Location, Including The Prison

Everything Outside The Courtroom Was Filmed On Location, Including The Prison
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Shooting on-site poses many more problems than shooting on set, such as the difficulty involved in controlling the environment, but Lynn ambitiously worked to capture all of the scenes apart from the courtroom on-location.

They even shot for several days in the wing dedicated to solitary confinement in a state prison in Georgia. It took forty minutes to get from the outside to the shooting location inside, with real prisoners shouting at them throughout their entire journey.

Robert DeNiro Was Wanted For The Lead Role Of Vinny

Robert DeNiro Was Wanted For The Lead Role Of Vinny
Catherine McGann/Getty Images
Catherine McGann/Getty Images

After the script was completed, the casting was the next priority. Launer met with Fox’s president, vice-president, and CEO to talk about potential actors. Launer suggested Robert De Niro for the role of Vincent LaGuardia Gambini, but the president was not excited about that choice, stating that De Niro wasn’t funny and that his movies don’t make money.

Ironically, De Niro’s comedies make him the most money out of the films he works on, and Launer jokes now that he feels “vindicated.”

Tomei Is From Brooklyn, But She Didn’t Have The Classic Accent Because Of Her Mom

accent
Instagram / @dreams_hollywood_
Instagram / @dreams_hollywood_

Despite being born and raised in Flatbush, Brooklyn, Tomei didn’t have the classic “Nuw Yawkher” accent that Mona Lisa Vito is known for. The reason is something many kids have to deal with: her mother correcting her speech.

Tomei told interviewers that because her mother was an English teacher, “she was on my butt about that kind of thing and correcting my speech from a young age.” Though, because of the movie, Tomei says she still sounds a little more Brooklyn than she used to, no doubt to her mother’s chagrin.

Lisa Gaye Inspired Tomei’s Character

Lisa Gaye Inspired Tomei's Character
Instagram / @thinkingboutgws
Instagram / @thinkingboutgws

In part, Launer based the role of Mona Lisa Vito on ’50s and 60’s actress Lisa Gaye, who was known for her beauty and prolific work in Hollywood. When it came to casting, Lynn said a talent agency put just about every actress they represented up for part except Tomei. Every actress the agency offered was wrong for the role, and many turned it down, claiming it wasn’t a big enough gig.

In the end, Lynn knew Tomei was the perfect choice based on the way she delivered one line in the first scene they shot with her.

The Prison Guards Weren’t Actors

The Prison Guards Weren't Actors
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Since the movie was filmed in a real state prison, that meant the guards that milled around in the prison scene were real working guards. It makes complete sense considering there were also actual prisoners featured in the movie.

The real-life guards were featured in two scenes that they also used real prisoners: when Stan and Bill are brought into the prison, and when they play basketball. We’re curious if their spots as extras counted as community service.

The Screech Owl Wasn’t A Prop

The Screech Owl Wasn't A Prop
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Pesci has zero luck with sleeping-in during the entire movie. One of the funniest running gags of the film is the fact that the world is determined to stopping Pesci from getting the shut-eye he wants.

He gets woken up by a steam whistle, pigs, and that iconic screeching white owl. Audiences thought the bird was a dummy since for the shot, it looked right at Vinny and then at the camera, but it was just a well-trained bird.

The Director Laughed So Hard During One Scene He Had To Hide Behind A Camera

The Director Laughed So Hard During One Scene He Had To Hide Behind A Camera
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Sometimes working with friends can be a little distracting—something director Jonathon Lynn knows all too well. When casting for the role of John Gibbons, the original defense counsel, Lynn chose his old friend and actor Austin Pendelton.

The results were as you might expect working with a close friend. Lynn was laughing so hard during Pendleton’s opening speech that he had to duck behind the camera and try not to make a noise.

There Was Almost A Sequel

There Was Almost A Sequel
20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Since the movie was well-received by audiences and critics alike, there was talk of producing a sequel, however, at the time Marisa Tomei wasn’t on board.

Of course, they couldn’t do the sequel without the iconic Mona Lisa Vito, so the talks never moved into production. Many years later Tomei changed her mind, but producers and writers felt that too much time had passed since the original and it wouldn’t do well at the box office. It’s a shame really, because apparently Vinny may have gone to Europe.