Investigative Facts About Dragnet

Taking its name from the police term “Dragnet,” a system of coordinated procedures for taking down criminals, Dragnet is a radio, television, and film series beginning in 1949 and ending in 2004. It follows Los Angeles detective Sergeant Joe Friday and his partners as they solve cases, many of which were based on real-life events. Today, Dragnet is considered to be one of the most influential police procedural dramas in history and is noted for helping to improve the relationship between citizens and police officers. Take a look to see what made Dragnet so impactful, and how it paved the way for future crime shows.

It Was Inspired By A Movie Based On True Events

He Walked By Night poster
Eagle-Lion Films
Eagle-Lion Films

Dragnet creator and star John Rudolph “Jack” Webb became particularly interested in the behind-the-scenes details of police investigations while working on the 1948 film He Walked by Night. The movie was based on a real-life murder case with Webb cast as the crime lab technician.

The documentary-style of the film helped inspire Webb to create a similar police drama series. He then worked with Chief William H. Parker of the Los Angeles Police Department to develop the premise for Dragnet and his character Sergeant Joe Friday.

There Was Little Time To Go Over Lines

Photo of Jack Webb
FPG/Getty Images
FPG/Getty Images

If you watched enough Dragnet, you’d know that the dialogue is presented in a way that makes it feel almost formulaic. This is because, as a producer, Webb made sure to cut costs where he could, with one of these being limited rehearsal times.

Instead of memorizing their lines, he preferred that actors read them off of a teleprompter instead. This process worked out in a number of different cases, especially when Sergeant Friday is questioning a witness, which made it feel all the more realistic.

Webb Had A Clever Way Of Avoiding Special Effects

Picture of car accident
NBC
NBC

Constantly thinking about keeping the cost of the show to a minimum, Jack Webb also developed ways to avoid using special effects while successfully depicting a gruesome scenario.

An excellent example of this is in the 1967 episode “The Hit and Run Driver,” where Sergeant Joe Friday describes the horrific details of what happens in the first second of a head-on car collision at 55 miles an hour. During his description, he simultaneously shows a series of black-and-white photos of the accident, which helps to paint a disturbing picture in the viewer’s mind.

Lieutenant Klingin Was A Real Person

Webber and actors
NBC
NBC

In episodes throughout the show’s run, there are frequent references to a police officer known as Lieutenant Klingin, usually in situations that involved a lie detector test. A fun fact about the officer mentioned is that he was a real police officer with the LAPD who would sometimes act as an adviser for police matters on the show.

Furthermore, Gene Roddenberry, who created the Star Trek franchise, also worked in the LAPD’s public relations department and went on to name the Star Trek race “Klingons” after officer Klingin.

Keeping The Same Clothes

Jack Webb And Harry Morgan
Pinterest/Bob the Astorian
Pinterest/Bob the Astorian

In order to ensure that the show never had any real problems with continuity, the characters Joe Friday and Bill Gannon wore the same outfits in every episode. However, according to Harry Morgan, who played Gannon, he and Webb switched coats for one scene to see if any eagle-eyed viewers would notice.

The scene only featured Morgan, so no one even on set noticed the switch until after it had already been shot. This is considered to be the only time there was faulty continuity in regards to clothing on the show’s run.

Webb’s Connection With Cigarettes

dragnet series still image
NBC
NBC

Looking back, Dragnet was very in touch with the times that it was filmed in. The cars, clothing, and mannerisms of the characters all align perfectly with the time period, especially when it came to smoking.

Characters would smoke anytime and any place, which was not only realistic but helped put money in Webb’s pocket. Webb promoted cigarettes for L&M and Chesterfield cigarettes both in TV commercials and print advertisements, which bled into his character on the show. Unfortunately, his three-pack-a-day habit most likely caused his fatal heart attack at the age of 62.

The First Color Episode Of The Show Explored Psychadelic Substances

Man with face painted
NBC
NBC

Dragnet actually ended up having to separate runs on television. The first was in black and white, and the second was in color, premiering with its first episode “Blue Boy” in 1967. At the time of its premiere, some psychedelic substances were still legal, as the effects were still mostly a mystery.

The episode explored such substances and their effects, which was viewed as pretty progressive at the time. In 1997, TV Guide ranked the “Blue Boy” episode of Dragnet as No. 85 in its list of “100 Greatest Episodes of All Time.”

Changing Friday’s Position

Color version of Joe Friday
NBC
NBC

When the original run of Dragnet ended in 1959, Sergeant Joe Friday had been promoted to Lieutenant. However, Webb made the decision when starting the new run of the show to keep Joe Friday as a sergeant rather than continuing on with his promotion.

His logic behind this decision was according to Webb that “few people remember that Friday was promoted toward the end of our run. We think it’s better to have Joe a sergeant again. Few detective-lieutenants get out into the field.”

Frequent Guests Stars

Actors on Dragnet
NBC
NBC

Two of the show’s standard guest stars were Virginia Gregg and Bert Holland, who both appeared in 13 episodes, the most guest appearances for non-police roles. Clark Howat and Art Gilmore were also regulars on the show with Howat appearing in 21 episodes and Gilmore in 14.

The two would make appearances as higher-up police officers, although neither played the same role twice, but rather a mix of a series of captains, lieutenants, inspectors, and more.

Webb Was Honored By The Police

Webb in a tuxedo
Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

The Los Angeles Police Department was so impressed with what Webb was able to accomplish with Dragnet and his portrayal of the police that they gave him an official detective badge with Friday’s number on it.

They also went on to name two buildings at the police academy after him, which were the Jack Webb Recruiting Building and Mark VII. Following his death, Webb was the first civilian to be buried with full police honors, and his character’s badge number, 714, was retired by the LAPD.

Webb Intended To Do A Third Run Of The Show

Jack Webb wearing a hat
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Finding two runs of the show to not be enough, Webb had intentions of doing a third revival of the series in 1982. However, because of Harry Morgan’s commitment to working on the shows M*A*S*H and its spin-off AfterMash, he turned down Webb’s proposal to return.

Webb then figured he would cast Ken McCord as Friday’s new partner either as Jim Reed or a new character altogether. Unfortunately, his plan for a third run would never come to fruition as he died of a heart attack in 1982.

Alternate Weeks In Season Two

Jack Webb and Ben Alexander
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

During the second season of Dragnet, the show was aired unusually on alternate weeks when most shows were on a weekly basis. This is because Barton Yarborough, who played Friday’s original partner, Ben Romeo, had died during the filming of the first season.

In turn, this ended up putting a lot of stress on the filming schedule. It also resulted in several cast changes until Ben Alexander took over the role of Friday’s new and long-lasting partner, Frank Smith, from 1952 to 1957.

The Show Aided In The Creation Of Hit Singles

Ray Anthony Record
Pinterest
Pinterest

In the summer of 1953, the series resulted in the creation of two million-selling hit singles. The first was by Ray Anthony and his Orchestra, who recorded the theme music, which was titled “Dragnet,” which reached No.2 on the US Pop Charts.

The second, which reached No.1 on the charts, was a three-minute speaking satire performed by comedian Stan Freberg, along with his co-writers Daws Butler and June Foray, which was titled “St. George and the Dragonet.”

Some Episodes Were Based On Real-Life Cases

Dragnet cover
NBC
NBC

After being inspired while acting in the documentary-style film He Walks By Night, Technical Advisor Sergeant Marty Wynn of the LAPD, suggested that Webb make a radio show with a similar premise. The radio show went on to premiere in 1949.

Webb continued with this idea of real crime cases in the television version of the show, working closely with LAPD Detective Galindo, who worked on some of Los Angeles’ most notorious cases. Some of Detective Galindo’s experiences on the force were then tweaked and made into episodes.

Joe Friday Never Said “Just The Facts, Ma’am”

Photo of Stan Freberg
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Although “Just the facts, ma’am” is the most famous phrase to come out of the Dragnet franchise, it’s never actually in the show. Webb’s character Joe Friday would typically say, “All we want are the facts, ma’am” or “All we know are the facts, ma’am.”

The phrase came from satirist Stan Freberg on his 1953 record St. George and the Dragonet in which he changed the line slightly, which grew to be the timeless quote that we know today.

The Opening Of The Show Was Iconic

Dragnet intro
NBC
NBC

The prelude to each episode began with a narrator stating, “The story you are about to see is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent.” This was first spoken by George Fenneman and later by Hal Gibney.

Following the prelude, Joe Friday started the story saying, “This is the city. Los Angeles, California. I work here. I’m a cop.” However, after some complaints from real-life police officers, he changed it to “I carry a badge.”

There Were Film Spin-Offs

Dan and Tom Hanks
Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures

Midway through the series’ first run, a theatrical spin-off titled Dragnet was released in 1954. This was the first time in television history that a TV series spawned a movie, and the first time a movie spin-off was released while the original series was still running.

It was the first of three theatrical spin-offs. The other two were the made-for-TV Dragnet 1966 and Dragnet, a parody film starring Dan Aykroyd as Joe Friday’s nephew and Tom Hanks following in 1987.

There Were Remakes After Webb’s Death

New Dragnet cast
USA
USA

Although show creator and star Jack Webb passed away in 1982, that didn’t slow down the Dragnet franchise. The show returned in 1989 under the title The New Dragnet starring Jeff Osterhage and Bernard White as detectives Vic Daniels and Carl Molina. The show had 52 episodes over two seasons and came to an end in 1990.

Then, in 2003, L.A. Dragnet was released which was produced by Dick Wolf, the producer of the Law & Order series and its spin-offs, which were heavily influenced by the original Dragnet. Unfortunately, the show was canceled five episodes into its second season.

Webb Produced Several Spinoff Shows

Two actors as policemen
NBC
NBC

At one point, Webb made the decision to discontinue Dragnet after its fourth season to work on other spin-off projects. The first of these was a Dragnet spin-off titled Adam-12, which was a 30-minute police procedural show that focused on patrol officers instead of detectives like its parent show.

Premiering in 1968, the show ran for seven seasons, ending in 1975. In turn, Adam-12 spawned its own spin-off in 1972 titled Emergency!, which followed a Fire Department paramedic team. The show ran for one season and had several made-for-TV movies.

In Remembrance Of Webb’s Uncle

Ben Alexander and Jack Webber
Pinterest/Sheila Warner Eitinear
Pinterest/Sheila Warner Eitinear

Jack Webb was born in Santa Monica, California on April 2, 1920 to Samuel and Margaret Webb. Sadly, Webb never knew his father who left his mother before he was born.

The only real adult male figure he had in his life was his uncle Frank Smith, who had a positive impact on Webb’s life. Because of this, Sergeant Joe Friday’s partner in the 1950s run of the show was Officer Frank Smith who was played by Ben Alexander